This topic contains 57 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  craftysprinkles 5 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #3427

    Snagg1
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      I got to thinking that since Lisa G and I are working on the Mixed Media and Canvas class series, that it would be helpful to know just enough to be dangerous on a few of the more common mediums.

      I'm not an expert when it comes to Gesso and I certainly don't use it as often as some others, but I do know a few basics. My hope is that you will get goopy and try a few of these and then in true savage fashion, you will make it your own and do something incredible. I also want this tutorial to be an organic, living thread. Huh? LOL What that means is that if you know something really cool to do with gesso tell us! Post a link. Upload your project. Let's all lea from one another!

      A few things to know about gesso: Can be purchased in 3 colors: White, Black & Clear

      1) Gesso is most commonly used as a primer. Once applied, your surface will have what is known as tooth. Essentially, a grippy surface for any additional mediums to stick to.

      2) Gesso can be used to stiffen surfaces. *stop giggling* If you use it to stiffen paper you need to be sure to do one side at a time. Let the first side dry completely before treating the other side.

      3) You can tint gesso. Acrylic paint is most commonly used. Pay attention to how viscous your colorant is. Too watery then you will end up with a wash.

      4) You can make a wash out of gesso and use it to cover a collage. This will unify your project.

      5) Clear gesso can be applied over a semi-gloss or glossy surface to give it some tooth. Now you can create on that surface.

      6) Can be used as an adhesive for adding texture (glass beads, pumice, glitter). You can use a stencil, apply the gesso, carefully remove the stencil and then add your texture. Once it has dried you will need to apply glue over the top to seal it in, have to apply glue over the top to seal the surface.

      7) Stamp with it – apply directly to stamp with a sponge and then stamp onto paper. *I provide examples below of this.

      8 ) Embossing – apply a layer of gesso – let it sit long enough to get a skin but not dry, apply pressure to a stamp or other texture and then pull off. *example below

      9) Create cool textures using saran wrap. Apply the saran wrap while it is wet and then remove it (while still wet) for softer lines, keep on until dry and then remove for crisper lines.

      10) Scribe into it. *example below

      11) Use it to tone down patteed or vibrant colored paper. If you apply a really thin coat you will end up with an opaque haze.

      12) can act as a resist

      ***Stamping with Gesso

      Stamp1.jpg
      Supplies:
      White Gesso
      Sponge
      Stamp
      Your project

      Stamp2.jpg

      Apply gesso to your stamp. Give it a good coat, but not goopy.

      Stamp3.jpg

      Apply medium pressure (depending on your stamp you may need more or less). Lift your stamp straight up from your project.

      Stamp4.jpg

      I added a second stamp to this. I wanted you to see what a more detailed, finer-lined stamp would look like. Once your gesso has dried and harded you can now continue adding layers of colors. You can see that these are not really taking any color. I'm using distress inks and the gesso is resisting it. Now I can finish embellishing my tag.

      ****Embossing gesso using a stamp

      EmbedStamp1.jpg

      Supplies
      Project
      White Gesso
      Palette knife
      stamp

      EmbedStamp2.jpg

      Apply a coat of gesso to your project. You don't want it to thin. You need it to be thick enough for an impression to show up. *note – most mists and inks will bleed into your gesso. Not a ton, but enough to tint it. I misted my tag for a few reasons. You'll see in the next step.

      EmbedStamp3.jpg

      You need to let your gesso dry to the point that there is a skin. Think pudding. You don't want the gesso to dry all the way through. You can tell that a skin has formed because the surface will dull a bit and look hazy. Press your stamp straight down and then lift it straight up. You may end up having to peel your project off your stamp. Just move carefully.

      The main reason I misted the tag first was so that you can see my embedded image better. My stamp has removed most, if not all, of the gesso.

      EmbedStamp4.jpg

      Let the gesso dray and harden. I misted my tag one more time with blue chalkboard mist. Don't let liquid stay on the gesso too long. It will soften it up and you will end up with mush. I blotted the mist off the tag. This gave me some additional texture to my surface. Also, you can see where some of the text has changed color as well. I used a stamp around the edge to create another layer. Now I can finish embellishing my tag.

      ***Scribe – can be done using anything

      Scribe1.jpg

      Supplies:
      Contrasting paper and gesso
      scribe tool

      Scribe2.jpg

      The whole key to this? You guessed it. Your background and gesso need to be conrasting colors. You can use a stylus, a comb, your fingers….whatever. Let the gesso dry and continue adding layers.

      #133395

      Snagg1
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        OMG Is everything gigantic?

        #133396
        Krissy
        Krissy
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          This is great Lisa. Thanks.

          #133398
          Krissy
          Krissy
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            I'm thrilled it's gigantic…it makes it easier to see…ha! Absolutely awesome toot by the way!

            #133400

            craftysprinkles
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              I have a question: do different brands of gesso have different consistencies? I have used a couple of different brands that are pretty runny, like acrylic paint. Is that Claudine Hellmuth brand thicker?

              #133397

              craftysprinkles
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                Btw, thank you for posting this, Lisa!!

                #133401

                Awesome Lisa! Thank you!!

                #133394

                Snagg1
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                  I have a question: do different brands of gesso have different consistencies? I have used a couple of different brands that are pretty runny, like acrylic paint. Is that Claudine Hellmuth brand thicker?

                  Believe it or not, I've found that the cheaper brands are runnier. I think there is a grade to the gesso. If I remember right there might be a student and professional grade. The professional grade is thicker. Claudine's is nice. I would describe it as medium. If I put it on a palette knife and then tu it on its side, it will slowly begin to slide off. It's pretty creamy. That is what I used for my examples. Golden and Liquitex make a nice product too. Personally, I like theirs better than Claudine's.

                  #133399

                  Awesome Lisa! And I like your Super-Sized pics, it shows all the lil details.

                  #133402

                  Thanks, Lisa! I like the big pictures also!

                  #133403

                  craftysprinkles
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                    Lisa, thank you so very much!!!
                    (And now for why I beg for steps at the level of See Spot Run.) (I'm soooooo embarrassed, I am just so dense…)
                    In example #2: Are you misting and drying, then applying the Gesso, then semi drying, then applying an inked or uninked stamp?
                    I am really that 🙁 ( sorry.

                    #133404
                    Krissy
                    Krissy
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                      This looks very neat. I will have to play around for awhile before I do my challenge LO. I have never used gesso before. Thank you so much Lisa for giving us this tutorial.

                      #133405

                      Gesso is such a fun product!!!
                      Thanks for sharing these amazing tips Lisa.
                      Love your samples!!

                      #133406

                      Snagg1
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                        Lisa, thank you so very much!!!
                        (And now for why I beg for steps at the level of See Spot Run.) (I'm soooooo embarrassed, I am just so dense…)
                        In example #2: Are you misting and drying, then applying the Gesso, then semi drying, then applying an inked or uninked stamp?
                        I am really that 🙁 ( sorry.

                        LOL You are not dense and don't need to be sorry. Example #2 where I embed my stamp into my tag. I misted my tag first. I used Lettuce by Ranger. It comes out pretty dark on the tag. I used my heat gun to dry it thoroughly. Then I applied gesso over the entire tag. You will begin to see some of the color bleed into the gesso. It gives it a bit of a tint in places. Let the gesso dry to a point that a skin develops on the surface. My stamp was un-inked. (It looks like it has been inked in the photo but my stamp has been stained by using archival ink and I never really got it cleaned off). When you lift your stamp up it will lift gesso off with it. (refer to the photo) That is why you can see the verse from my stamp, and another reason why it looks cool to start out with a colored background. At this point you need to let your project dry completely and harden. Then I misted my project again and blotted it dry. The moisture will soften the gesso and it will become mushy so you need to blot and then use your heat gun. Blotting with a scrunched paper towel leaves a nice texture. You will also see that the mist has been able to sink into your embedded image and it has changed colors in places. After that dried, I did some additional stamping with an inked stamp, around the edge.

                        Did that make more sense? If not, let me know. Ask as many questions as you need to. 🙂

                        #133409

                        OMG Is everything gigantic?

                        Ginormous is good….

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